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Lighting Companies in the US Expect Delayed Product Supply due to Coronavirus Epidemic

The outbreak of novel coronavirus continues to escalate and the production in China is postponing due to the epidemic, leading to expected production and supply chain delay. US-based lighting companies, Cooper Lighting Solutions and Satco, posted a notice respectively to inform their customers of the possible interruption of product supply.

Cooper Lighting Solution noted in its “Coronavirus Update” that due to travel and logistics suspensions enacted by Chinese authorities, its suppliers have not resume production yet. This delay in operations capabilities will drive an interruption in the supply chain for some products in the coming weeks.

The company said that it will try to minimize the delays and is working on prioritizing the production schedule to support its customers as best as it can. Meanwhile, Cooper Lighting also indicated that it will increase capabilities of its manufacturing facilities in North America with local components and materials.

Satco also sent a letter to its customers elaborating the on-going situation in China due to the coronavirus outbreak. Since employees traveling back to work from other area will remain in quarantine for 14 days under the government’s supervision even when factories resume production, lack of work force is foreseen.

Satco indicated that it has significant stock levels in its domestic warehouses and is working with its supplier to ship high priority items first. However, the company still anticipated impacts on the supply chain and will take measure to ensure return to normal inventory levels.

Properties of Light and How They’re Used in Architecture

If you’re a lighting manufacturer or supplier, you already know that light has a major effect on how a person experiences a space.

Did you know that architects and building engineers rely on these same principles and the science of lighting when designing a space? The main architectural principles of lighting can be broken down into three categories: light color, measuring light, and bouncing light.

Light Color

In architecture, the standard for white light is considered daylight at noon during the month of June. According to experts, Northern light is generally the most consistent and has more light at the blue end of the spectrum, while late afternoon light is more on the red end of the spectrum.

Measuring Light

Luminous Flux – This is the rate at which a light source emits light, measured in lumens.
Luminous Intensity – The measure of the light intensity that takes into account the amount of light and the amount of coverage. For example, a spot light and a flood light may emit the same high amount of lumens, but because the spot light is focused into a smaller cone, it has a much higher intensity. Intensity is measured in candelas or candlepower.
Illuminance – Illuminance is the amount of light that falls on a specific surface area. Measured in lux (metric) or foot candles (imperial – read more about foot candles here), a 1000 lumen spot light will illuminate a small area much more than a 1000 flood light because more lumens from a spot light are hitting the smaller surface.
Luminance – Luminance is the measure of an object’s brightness or the amount of light coming off an illuminated surface. This measurement is called a foot-lambert.

Don’t Forget to Consider Bouncing Light

When choosing fixtures and designing the space for optimal light, consider the reflections that will occur in the room depending on windows, furniture, and accessories (especially mirrors and other reflective surfaces).

Remember, besides the principles of lighting, choosing the right lighting for a residential or commercial space come down to how the space should physically feel (for example, the right lighting can make a room feel larger), and more lighting isn’t always better! Choosing the right lighting is the most important thing.

Trust Parker Lighting as Your Preferred Lighting Supplier

We have knowledgeable associates who can assist you in choosing the appropriate products for your specific application.

 

Upgrade Your Business in 2020 with LED Lights

According to energy.gov, “an average household dedicates about 5% of its energy budget to lighting. Switching to energy-efficient lighting is one of the fastest ways to cut your energy bills.”

By replacing your business or homes’ five most frequently used light fixtures or lamps with models that have earned the ENERGY STAR rating, you can save $45 each year.

Why is going green important for consumers and lighting manufacturers?

  • 90% of the energy is given off as heat
  • That lost energy is money you are throwing away!
  • Newer energy-saving lightbulbs provide the choices in colors and light levels you’ve come to expect. The new lights are also much more efficient — so they save business owners and homeowners money over the long term.

Did you know…?

  1. LED lights are up to 80% more efficient than traditional lighting.
  2. 95% of the energy in LEDs is converted into light and only 5% is wasted as heat. This is compared to fluorescent lights which convert 95% of energy to heat and only 5% into light!
  3. LED lights also draw much less power than traditional lighting; a typical 84 watt fluorescent can be replaced by a 36 watt LED to give the same level of light.
  4. 40% of a business’s electric bill is for lighting. The average US small business electric bill is $670 per month with $268 of that bill just for lighting.
  5. Installing LED lighting will save 40-90% of your business’s electric bill. Additionally, you will not have to replace lamps for 10 to 20 years, removing any maintenance and replacement costs for that period.

Trust Parker Lighting as Your Preferred Lighting Supplier

We have knowledgeable associates who can assist you in choosing the appropriate products for your specific application.

To find out more about how LED lighting can change the way you do business, contact one of our experts for more information!

Guidelines for Bathroom Lighting

When it comes to proper lighting, one of the most important rooms in your home is the bathroom. When you first wake up in the morning, the lighting in the bathroom can set the mood for your entire day!

The lighting in a bathroom is especially important when you’re washing and grooming. Optimized lighting and daylighting are also important for our circadian rhythms, which can play a big role in overall health.

Good lighting is important for everyone, and the best bathroom illumination opportunities can be broken down into these categories:

  • Light levels – How much light is needed in the bath? For someone just waking up, 10 foot candles (fc) might be plenty. After a shower when it’s time to shave, or if you’re trying to read the small print on a medication label, better visibility is needed. Lighting experts say fixtures that provide at least 75 to 100 watts of illumination are ideal for master or guest bathrooms.
  • Daylighting – Natural daylight is perfect for brightening your mood and helping to set the circadian rhythms that regulate our sleep cycles. Try to design your bathroom with as much natural light as possible. Consider a skylight if possible in addition to one or more windows.
    Overall bath lighting – If you like a more luxurious design in your bathroom, a chandelier or can bring elegance to any space. A warmer light temperature in a bathroom will give it a spa-like feeling.
  • Vanity lighting – In front of the bathroom mirror, lighting is very important! You want to see colors accurately, and have the option to dim or raise the light levels if needed. LEDs are preferred over fluorescent because they’re easier to dim.
  • Lighting at the Tub – Building codes are strict about lighting over tubs. Since there can’t be open or hanging fixtures over the tub, nd spotlights work.
  • Night Lighting – Some light is needed in the bathroom at night for safety, but not too much. When the eyes are adjusted to darkness, very few foot candles are needed. A 5-watt nightlight is just right for most homes, according to lighting experts.

Trust Parker Lighting as Your Preferred Lighting Supplier

We have knowledgeable associates who can assist you in choosing the appropriate products for your specific application.

How To Hide Under Cabinet Lighting Wires

Do you have those rooms in your house that are decidedly dark and dingy looking around certain areas? We’re thinking of kitchens where corners and sections of the countertops have the main ceiling lighting blocked by the cabinets above.

This can be remedied with the use of practical, compact and versatile under cabinet lighting fixtures. However, one of the major downsides to using this style of lighting, is that it requires an extensive network of wiring that, if left uncovered, can make your kitchen look rather untidy and messy.

However, there are ways to avoid this happening. By using some forethought, planning, preparation and clever designs, you can hide the wiring for those under-cabinet lighting so that it will look like areas of your kitchen or other dark rooms light up as if by magic.

Placement of the Wiring
As you read further through this article, you will see a lot of suggestions that revolve around interesting and aesthetically pleasing ways to cover over the wiring. What, though, if that’s not an option, can you still hide them?

Yes, the idea is to keep the wires affixed to the wall or surface as close to the bottom edge at the front of the cabinet as they can, using a slight overhand on the cabinet to keep them hidden.

However, if you run the wiring around the bottom edge of the cabinets at the back, they will be more easily spotted whenever you or anyone else walks into the room.

Wooden Valances
You will find some lighting fixtures tend to hang down somewhat from the underside of cabinets, which is not ideal if you are trying to keep the fixture or just the wiring hidden.

This problem can be solved by installing a wooden valance to the underside using some wood adhesive to extend the front face of the cabinet.

You can decorate this wood appropriately so that even if you don’t find the right color to match from the beginning, you can use a stain or paint to get it as close to the rest of the furniture as possible.

You then just need to use staples or tie wraps to keep the wiring securely hidden beneath the cabinet and behind the valance.

Inside the Cabinetry
If you are starting from scratch and have the benefit of foresight to plan out where the wiring is going to go, you could make necessary cuts into the cabinet where you can feed the wires so that they are hidden.

This is a great plan for recessed lighting, with the end of the light fixture penetrating the cabinet. That section will need a wooden plank placed across the top that’s exposed with a hole and channel made inside it to allow you to feed the wiring through the cabinet and into the outlet on the wall.

To create a neat and tidy hole and channel you can use a router. The wooden plank can then slide into place within the cabinet’s interior. To finish you need to use a wooden plank without any openings to cover the completed construction.

Cable Protectors
We’ve left one of the simplest and quickest ways to keep unattractive and unsightly wiring for under-cabinet lighting out of the way. That is with cable protector. One way to do this is by bundling the wiring carefully and compactly into a bundle and then using tie wraps to hold it in place.

You can then stick it the underside of the cabinet using staples (being careful of course not to pierce the wiring and ruining all your hard work). The length of the wiring should be long enough to run from the lighting fixture itself to the wall outlet.

A cable protector normally takes the form of a wooden rectangle with a length the same as the bundle of secured wiring.

You can then use a router tool to cut a special groove into the wood where the bundle of wires can lie safely and securely without there being the possibility it will be pinched.

Then you finish the work by installing the cable protector over the bundle of wires on the cabinet’s underside to completely hide the wiring as if it was never there in the first place.

If the wooden cable protector does not match the color of the cabinet, you can use a suitable stain or paint to make it all look seamless. Or as close to seamless as possible.

Obviously, if you can plan your under cabinet lighting solutions at the time when you are planning your kitchen, that would be the best and easiest way to keep the wiring hidden.

However, we know that’s not always possible. When it’s not the above tips are a great solution to ensure your kitchen looks as stunning as it should.

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