5 Reasons Businesses Love to Partner with Parker Lighting

Do you feel like lighting is throwing a wrench in your project schedule and you’re scrambling to get a lighting package engineered? And after review, you found the package doesn’t quite meet the original design intent?

There’s another way to do lighting.

Louis Hirsch i Owner of Parker Lighting

By working with a Parker Lighting early in the design process, you can avoid the value engineering crunch altogether and still come out ahead on your budget. Even more, you can be confident that the final product will be more consistent and on-brand across your projects.  Parker Lighting are specialists, supporting the architect’s efforts to deliver the kind of space the customer envisions, and ensuring the space is properly illuminated and compliant with code.

What does Parkerlighting do when designing my lighting project?
What exactly do we do? With a horde of different people involved in your national new construction or remodel projects, you might be wondering if Parker Lighting is worth it and how we differ from other people in the process.

Think of Parker Lighting as someone who helps close the communication loop on design, specification, and installation of lighting for your project. We have an advanced understanding of the technology behind the products you’re considering and sophisticated tools. This allows us to make sure your design is meeting your aesthetic requirements and the appropriate code requirements. (If you’ve had to deal with Title 24, you know how critical this can be.

At the end of the day, on every project and prototype, someone is specifying the lighting. Who specified it for the last design you did? Did you get the results you wanted for the price you budgeted?

Boiling it down, here are three of the greatest contributions a lighting designer can make:

  1. Meet the customer’s needs
    Parker Lighting establishes the performance of the proposed lighting scheme before a single item is purchased and installed.Using tools like AutoCAD, AGI32, and Revit combined with IES files from reputable lighting manufacturers, lighting designers’ model and compare the performance of different specification options.The photometric studies and 3D renderings help to eliminate the surprise of walking into a completed project that feels too dim, has dark corners, or seems to generally miss the design intent. It also helps you to avoid situations when the lighting package is “over-designed.”
  2. Meet the customer’s budget and timeline
    Parker Lighting gathers lead times and firm quotes to ensure budget and timeliness from the start.  It doesn’t get much worse than getting a lighting specification dialed in, just to hear a lighting distributor say the lead time is 12 weeks (after your project is supposed to be complete).
    Involving Parker Lighting ensures that you have preset budget costs and lead times for lighting specifications so you don’t end up with late-in-the-game surprises. Our team works closely together to accurately forecast lead times and gauge stock levels.
    We also draw from a wide range of manufacturers to ensure that you get the best performance, lead times, and pricing for your projects.
  3. Follow through
    Parker Lighting ensures the lighting ultimately installed in your space is consistent with your brand and vision.  One of the essential components of a great lighting specification is the ability to scale to multiple locations, reduce maintenance headaches, and ensure brand consistency. We have extensive knowledge of how to manipulate light paired with the practical wisdom on how to make lighting systems reliable and easy to maintain. 

    We are ready to serve you!

What’s the ROI of working with a Parker Lighting?

There are a few ways to estimate the return on investment of using Parker Lighting for your project.

Material savings
If you work with a lighting designer that has relationships with a wide range of reputable manufacturers, they’ll be able to source the perfect product for your application at the most cost-effective price. You’ll find yourself saving a great deal on material savings by partnering with a lighting designer to find a solution that solves all of your problems.

Energy and maintenance savings
Parker Lighting are also experts in optimizing lighting specifications for maximum efficiency and ease of maintenance. Consider the long-term savings that you could gain through the right lighting.

Project efficiency
Although it’s hard to estimate the financial impact of a more efficiently run project, the reduced stress isn’t hard to imagine. As someone who has overseen multiple new construction rollouts or national retrofits, you’ll be able to see the difference in the fluid communication and reduced surprises on projects involving Parker.

Brand consistency and design intent
Matching the overall design intent is another way to measure the ROI of using a lighting designer. This is another benefit that’s difficult to measure in financial impact, but a consistent brand presented to your customer or tenants makes your business more trustworthy and attractive. That’s an important win.

Increased sales from good lighting
Though study after study shows that quality lighting makes a difference to shoppers, lighting remains one of those things that is often taken for granted. It’s sort of like cell phone service or drinking water.

It’s not something most people pay attention to unless it’s off.
Just like cellular networks and purified drinking water, details matter in lighting. Ensuring a cell signal isn’t spotty or that the total dissolved soluble content of water is palatable is a science. And it’s pretty easy to mess up.

With lighting, mistakes rarely go unnoticed. And even the less-noticed ones can have a trickle-down effect on sales. The job of the lighting designer is to help you avoid such oversights, ensuring your lighting is sharp, consistent, and right for your brand – putting your product in the best possible light, rather than merely illuminating the space around it.

Lighting Companies Including GE Current and LEDVANCE Sponsor Free LED Lights for Coronavirus Remote Site Testing

The National Lighting Bureau (NLB), through its members, is offering free LED lights for the remote sites being set up across the U.S. to test for the coronavirus.

The Bureau provides its services to the public free of charge with the funding of the organization’s sponsors, which include individuals, professional societies, trade associations, labor unions, manufacturers, and agencies of the U.S. government. The participated associates include:

  • BIOS Lighting
  • Finelite
  • GE Current, a Daintree Company
  • Healthe by Lighting Science
  • Illuminating Engineering Society (IES)
  • Imperial Lighting Maintenance Company
  • Inspired LED
  • International Association of Lighting Management Companies (NALMCO)
  • International Brotherhood of Electrical Workers (IBEW)
  • Kurtzon Lighting
  • LEDVANCE
  • Lighting Controls Association (LCA)
  • Lutron Electronics Company, Inc.
  • National Electrical Contractors Association (NECA)
  • National Electrical Manufacturers Association (NEMA)
  • New Star Lighting
  • Pompeo Group
  • QSSI
  • Truly Green Solutions
  • Universal Lighting Technologies
  • U.S. General Services Administration
  • ZLED Lighting

Ray Kasmark, NLB Chairman, said, “We believe that quality lighting inside of the tents will increase throughput while improving the safety and comfort during the testing process.”

Mood Changers: Lighting Design 101 – Why Lighting Is The Most Important Design Feature

Walk into a room bathed in cozy, inviting light and you’ll feel instantly at ease. Walk into the same room buzzing with harsh fluorescents, and your teeth may start to grind.

Why?

In 2019, a Journal of Consumer Psychology study found that the more intense the lighting, the more affected and intense the participants’ emotions were — both positive and negative.

The study included six experiments that examined the link between emotion and ambient brightness. Feelings of warmth increased when participants were exposed to bright light with hints of reddish hues. A sensation of angst increased when bluer light dominated.

And the brighter the light, the more intense the participants’ emotions became. Both the intensity and the color of the light affected people’s moods.

How Does This Affect Your Next Remodel?

When designing a space, lighting needs to be addressed as soon as the space itself, and how it will be used, are defined.

For example, if it’s an office space you are designing, “office lighting should encourage alertness and productivity,” said Rebecca Hadley, manager of Eaton’s SOURCE lighting education center. It also helps to “incorporate controls that allow for changes throughout the day. Ideally, you’d have the ability to adjust the intensity of your lighting with a dimmer switch.”

When lighting for a home, the purpose of each room comes into play. The kitchen, a work space, demands brighter, high CRI (color accurate) light while the living room calls for more mellow, warmer lighting.

“Our association of orange-ish light with feelings of warmth and relaxation is probably evolutionary and originates from our earliest ancestors who, for both warmth and safety from predators, made sure to light a fire at night.”

-David Hakimi, Alcon Lighting Co-Founder

The entrance of your home should welcome guests, creating a smooth transition from the bright daylight to your home’s interior lighting. At night, the lighting should ease the visitor from the dark outdoors into a warm interior light that will not overload their senses and help them relax. Before bed, lighting should be lowered to promote “winding down” but remain bright enough so that you can navigate your home safely.

 

Mimicking Outdoor Lighting

Vast research documents the many benefits of incorporating natural light into our living spaces. According to Architectural Lighting Magazine, natural light — or daylighting — provides the stimulation needed to regulate human circadian rhythms, or the internal body clock. Learn more about the health benefits of natural light here.

In addition to circadian rhythms, natural light also affects our moods and can increase productivity and comfort in a workplace setting. A study by HMG titled “Daylighting Impacts on Retail Sales Performance,” found that the presence of skylights was the third-most important criterion of statistically significant factors in increasing sales volume. HMG also studied daylighting in schools and found a strong connection between schools that reported improvements in test scores — more than 10 percent — and those that reported increased natural lighting in the classroom.

Natural lighting can have a similar impact when incorporated in a home’s lighting plan. Beyond energy savings, exposure to natural light improves mood and can help make falling asleep easier. Spending your day in areas that are enhanced by natural light can improve the function of your circadian rhythm, which can increase your happiness and energy levels. Exposing yourself to too much blue light from electronics in the evening is directly associated with the opposite effect, which you can read more about here.

Eaton’s Hadley said industry research suggests indoor light (during the day) should mimic the color of light we experience outside by seeking similar gradations over time: “…cool light in the morning, to white light at midday, to warm light in the evening.”

Of course, the most important factor in lighting your home is what you yourself prefer. But Alcon Lighting’s David Hakimi recommends one key step everyone can take to create a calm, pleasing environment that mimics outdoor lighting:

“At night, use lights that feature warmer color temperatures – those that fall in the 2,700 to 3,000 Kelvin range. Also, use a dimmer to lower the intensity of light as the night progresses. Lowering lighting actually helps reduce blood pressure and encourages people to relax. So dimmer lights in the bedroom — and reduce use of electronics.”

Flexibility is Key

Flexibility is one natural benefit of smart lighting design. New advancements in lighting controls have made lighting for mood easier than ever.

Newer LEDs with integrated controls and the ability to dim to warmer color temperatures are becoming popular in the hospitality industry because of their ability to affect the customer experience. “Warmer light and lower light levels have been shown to slow heart rate and create a relaxing state,” Hadley explained. “As a result, customers might be inspired to enjoy appetizers and cocktails rather than rushing through to the main course.” Conversely, some restaurants might put brighter light in an area where they want to turn tables quickly.

Color Plays a Role, Too — but it’s Easier to Adjust Lights.

Color is the most important aspect in lighting and mood.

However, Alcon’s Hakimi notes that It’s much easier to adjust lighting than to paint walls. In fact, you can change the color of your room just by brightening or dimming it.

The Most Important Design Element

With the ability to largely affect the mood of a room, lighting is the most important element to consider when designing a space.

In addition to altering the mood of the occupants in a room, lighting can transform the room in shape and size. In a den that is particularly small, painting the walls a light color and having extra lighting reflecting off the walls will help the room appear larger. Recessed lighting can add a soft glow to a room without protruding into the space, which can also help the room appear larger.

With its versatility in brightness levels and light colors, designers continue to turn to LED lighting. Advances in LED technology have led to several new fixtures, including LED skylights that imitate the look of a window and the sky. These “skylights” shed light that is the same temperature as natural light — offering an open, airy feeling and helping the room’s occupants to feel a more positive vibe.

With continued research and innovation in lighting, homeowners and designers have many options when it comes to selecting the right lighting to set the right mood for their space.

What’s an LED lighting retrofit?

LEDs use a fraction of the power that incandescent or fluorescent lighting consumes and last
many times longer than those types of bulbs, all while delivering the brightness, warmth and
color to fit your specific lighting needs. So now that you’re aware of how LEDs can save money,
improve lighting quality and reduce your carbon footprint, it’s time to put that green energy
solution to work for you.

You’ll often hear the word “retrofit” used to describe the replacement of your existing lighting
system with LEDs. It’s kind of odd that the word begins with “retro”, since that prefix usually
raises images of the past (think mullets and leisure suits) instead of the forward-thinking
technology that LEDs offer. Be that as it may, retrofit has become the accepted term for
upgrading your older lighting to newer, more energy efficient LED equipment.

Lighting accounts for about 15 to 20% of a typical commercial building’s energy use, so if you
haven’t already done an LED retrofit, every day you wait is costing you money. But if it’s any
consolation, you’re not alone. The U.S. Energy Information Administration says that as recently
as 2012, more than three-quarters of all the floor space in the nation’s commercial buildings was
lit by standard fluorescent lights, with another 6% of floor space still lit by incandescents.
Although LEDs have greatly increased their market share since that last government survey,
there is still a lot of old lighting out there that should be replaced.

It’s always best to take a whole-building approach to energy efficiency instead of treating each
separate measure – such as an LED retrofit – as a “one-off”. There are several reasons for this,
including the coordination among your building’s energy systems (i.e., installing low-heat LEDs
may impact your air conditioning needs) and more attractive rebates offered by utilities or
government entities for bundling energy efficiency measures to maximize energy savings.

Ideally, then, an LED retrofit is one part of an overall green energy solution for your business.
However, not every business owner may be in a financial position right now to undertake a
complete energy makeover. In that case, doing an LED retrofit as a stand-alone energy saving
measure immediately is better than waiting until a full upgrade can be made.

The first thing you should do before starting an LED retrofit is to decide why you want to do it. Is
it simply to reduce your energy costs (nothing wrong with that being the only reason!) or are you
also interested in adjusting the brightness or color quality of your lighting? What about using
lighting to improve the aesthetics of your space or the visual comfort of your employees or
customers? There are no right or wrong reasons for doing an LED retrofit, but knowing what
your goals are before you get started will help you install the lighting equipment you’ll need to
achieve them.

Once your goals are set, the next step is to have a lighting professional conduct a lighting audit.
An audit is the simplest and most effective way to evaluate your existing system and identify the
improvements needed to achieve your goals, ensuing that every area within your building has the
appropriate amount of light. The auditor’s recommendation will include the cost of each item and
an estimate of energy cost savings, so you can easily calculate how quickly your investment will
be repaid. If you have multiple locations that you’re looking to upgrade, it’s best to use the same
auditor for each site so you’ll have a consistent approach to the retrofits. An Ecology Action
energy efficiency advisor can assist you in choosing the lighting auditor who can best serve your
needs.

One of the advantages of LED lighting is that it can be used in existing fixtures, saving the cost of
installing new ones (as many businesses did years ago when they converted from incandescent
to fluorescent). In many cases, your existing fluorescent lighting fixtures can be retrofitted to LED
by simply removing the ballast and fluorescent lamp holders and replacing the fluorescent tubes
with LED tubes. There are also applications that offer a “plug and play” option, allowing you to
swap out your fluorescent tube with an LED without the need for removing the ballast and lamp
holders.

If you can’t use your existing fixtures for any reason, or if you’re altering your building’s lighting
plan by changing their location, you may need to install new LED fixtures. This is going to be a
more expensive option, but may result in greater long-term savings because fixtures specifically
designed for LEDs will operate more effectively than a retrofitted fluorescent fixture.

Incorporating lighting controls into your LED retrofit has the potential of increasing your energy
efficiency by providing the right amount of light when and where it’s needed. Lighting controls can
be as simple as a timer that turns lights on or off at pre-set times. They can also include more
advanced devices, like occupancy sensors that automatically turn on lights when motion is
detected in a space that isn’t continually in use (these have become popular in storage areas,
restrooms and conference rooms) or photocells that will adjust lighting levels depending on the
amount of available daylight.

In addition to meeting your building’s indoor lighting needs, the versatility of LEDs makes them
ideal for any of your outdoor lighting requirements. An LED’s performance is not affected by hot
or cold weather, which is why you see them now being used in safety-related outdoor
applications like traffic signals, streetlights and vehicle headlights. Commercial buildings often
have “wall pack lighting”, the fixtures mounted on the outside walls that provide both security for
the building and pathway lighting employees or customers. Wall pack lighting can also be used
for aesthetic purposes by illuminating the outside of your building. Lighting designers can take
advantage of the directional nature of LEDs and the variety of color temperatures available to
create dramatic effects while reducing your energy costs.

If your building has an outdoor parking lot or enclosed parking – like an adjacent deck or
underground parking – it’s important to include those areas in your LED retrofit. Parking areas
can be an ideal place to produce energy savings because they generally require large amounts
of lighting for safety and security. Parking lots have traditionally used high intensity discharge, or
HID, lighting like metal halide and high-pressure sodium lamps. While these kinds of lights
provide the brightness needed for parking areas, they use a lot of electricity. LEDs can deliver
the same level of brightness while using a fraction of the electricity, and can direct their light
precisely onto the areas that need to be lit instead of diffusing it in all directions. They’ll also last
three to four times longer than most HIDs. As with interior lighting, some LED lamps can be
retrofitted into existing fixtures in parking areas, saving the cost of installing new fixtures.

An LED retrofit is a key part of a green energy solution for any business. It’s easy to do and can
yield big savings. An Ecology Action energy efficiency expert can get you started in brightening up
your business – and your bottom line – with LEDs.

Agri-tech Company to Grow Tomatoes in New York with LED Lighting

80 Acres Farms, an indoor farming operator, is growing tomatoes on one of the busiest streets in New York outside the Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum as part of the Guggenheim’s new exhibition in collaboration with Rem Koolhaas, Countryside, The Future, which is taking place from February 20 until August 14, 2020.

People in New York will be able to look through a large window in the indoor farm to view a crop of fresh tomatoes being grown continuously during the next six months under precise LED lighting and other controlled conditions. The first tomatoes grown will be ready for harvesting and consumption by late-March.

The grow module was set up to demonstrate how indoor farming can benefit the world through growing fresh, nutritious, and pesticide-free food near populations, anywhere in the world by using fewer natural resources. For the Guggenheim exhibition, 80 Acres Farms, Infinite Acres, and Priva have collaborated on the 700 square foot grow center and all of the state-of-the art ag-technology within it. The Infinite Acres grow module is expected to grow 50,000 tomatoes during the exhibition.

Get a free quote for your project. Click here.