Subway Trains and Buses in NYC Disinfected by UVC to Fight against Coronavirus Infection

The Metropolitan Transportation Authority (MTA) in New York City is using UV lamps to sanitize subway cars and buses for COVID-19 infection prevention, reported New York Daily News.

MTA announced that it will close the subway system from one to five a.m. every day since May 6, 2020 to deep clean and disinfect all the trains and buses to combat coronavirus. One of its disinfecting solution is using UV lamps to deliver UVC radiation for diminishing bacteria, viruses and other pathogens in the cars.

The disinfection project applying UV lamps was supported by MTA’s partnership with Columbia University. The UV lights will be tested on part of the subway trains and buses since May 11, 2020. The project would be expanded if researchers at Columbia University confirm the effectiveness afterward.

David Brenner, director of Columbia University’s Center for Radiological Research, noted that his research team is working on “far UVC” technology which can wipe out COVID-19 without causing harm to human body. Compared to the commonly known germicidal UV light with wavelength between 250nm to 280nm, far UVC light has shorter wavelength with the range of 205 to 230 nm and cannot reach or damage living human cells but can still kill viruses in the air or on surfaces.

Brenner said far-UVC light could be a game changer in the fight against COVID-19 as “it can be safely used in occupied public spaces, and it kills pathogens in the air before we can breathe them in.”

Coronavirus ‘Light It Blue’ Campaign Gives Thanks To Essential Workers

Hundreds of businesses and venues nationwide express gratitude to the front liners

Last Thursday was the #Light It Blue campaign as communities across the country, and even the world, spotlighted historic buildings, major sports stadiums and event venues, national landmarks and even Niagara Falls in blue lighting as a show of gratitude for health care professionals, first responders and essential workers caring for people on the front lines during the COVID-19 pandemic.

The #LightItBlue and #MakeItBlue movement began in the United Kingdom as major landmarks were lighted throughout the country in salute to health care providers. When introduced in the United States, support for the concept was impressive. The NFL joined the party. Mayors jumped on board. Major corporations lighted their headquarters.

Estimates are that more than 100 sites in New York City, home to the highest numbers of the coronavirus patients, and more than 400 other sites across America turned on the lights at 8 pm local time last Thursday. This age of LED lighting made the effort all the more dramatic.

“We hope it just creates this giant hug for all the health care workers and essential workers,” Michael Fiur, one of the Light It Blue campaign’s organizers and an internationally renowned entertainment producer, told CBS New York.

To name just a few prominent spots which embraced the group hug, let’s salute Arlington’s Globe Life Field, new home of the Texas Rangers whenever Major League Baseball resumes in its regular stadiums; Houston’s City Hall and all its major sports stadiums; Dallas’ Reunion Tower and Omni Hotel. And those are just some of the stunning shots corralled from Instagram.

Take a closer look at this new wave of blue, a symbol of heartfelt appreciation and thanks, that extended across the country to include Seattle’s Space Needle, Walt Disney World, Niagara Falls and more:

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