5 Reasons Businesses Love to Partner with Parker Lighting

Do you feel like lighting is throwing a wrench in your project schedule and you’re scrambling to get a lighting package engineered? And after review, you found the package doesn’t quite meet the original design intent?

There’s another way to do lighting.

Louis Hirsch i Owner of Parker Lighting

By working with a Parker Lighting early in the design process, you can avoid the value engineering crunch altogether and still come out ahead on your budget. Even more, you can be confident that the final product will be more consistent and on-brand across your projects.  Parker Lighting are specialists, supporting the architect’s efforts to deliver the kind of space the customer envisions, and ensuring the space is properly illuminated and compliant with code.

What does Parkerlighting do when designing my lighting project?
What exactly do we do? With a horde of different people involved in your national new construction or remodel projects, you might be wondering if Parker Lighting is worth it and how we differ from other people in the process.

Think of Parker Lighting as someone who helps close the communication loop on design, specification, and installation of lighting for your project. We have an advanced understanding of the technology behind the products you’re considering and sophisticated tools. This allows us to make sure your design is meeting your aesthetic requirements and the appropriate code requirements. (If you’ve had to deal with Title 24, you know how critical this can be.

At the end of the day, on every project and prototype, someone is specifying the lighting. Who specified it for the last design you did? Did you get the results you wanted for the price you budgeted?

Boiling it down, here are three of the greatest contributions a lighting designer can make:

  1. Meet the customer’s needs
    Parker Lighting establishes the performance of the proposed lighting scheme before a single item is purchased and installed.Using tools like AutoCAD, AGI32, and Revit combined with IES files from reputable lighting manufacturers, lighting designers’ model and compare the performance of different specification options.The photometric studies and 3D renderings help to eliminate the surprise of walking into a completed project that feels too dim, has dark corners, or seems to generally miss the design intent. It also helps you to avoid situations when the lighting package is “over-designed.”
  2. Meet the customer’s budget and timeline
    Parker Lighting gathers lead times and firm quotes to ensure budget and timeliness from the start.  It doesn’t get much worse than getting a lighting specification dialed in, just to hear a lighting distributor say the lead time is 12 weeks (after your project is supposed to be complete).
    Involving Parker Lighting ensures that you have preset budget costs and lead times for lighting specifications so you don’t end up with late-in-the-game surprises. Our team works closely together to accurately forecast lead times and gauge stock levels.
    We also draw from a wide range of manufacturers to ensure that you get the best performance, lead times, and pricing for your projects.
  3. Follow through
    Parker Lighting ensures the lighting ultimately installed in your space is consistent with your brand and vision.  One of the essential components of a great lighting specification is the ability to scale to multiple locations, reduce maintenance headaches, and ensure brand consistency. We have extensive knowledge of how to manipulate light paired with the practical wisdom on how to make lighting systems reliable and easy to maintain. 

    We are ready to serve you!

What’s the ROI of working with a Parker Lighting?

There are a few ways to estimate the return on investment of using Parker Lighting for your project.

Material savings
If you work with a lighting designer that has relationships with a wide range of reputable manufacturers, they’ll be able to source the perfect product for your application at the most cost-effective price. You’ll find yourself saving a great deal on material savings by partnering with a lighting designer to find a solution that solves all of your problems.

Energy and maintenance savings
Parker Lighting are also experts in optimizing lighting specifications for maximum efficiency and ease of maintenance. Consider the long-term savings that you could gain through the right lighting.

Project efficiency
Although it’s hard to estimate the financial impact of a more efficiently run project, the reduced stress isn’t hard to imagine. As someone who has overseen multiple new construction rollouts or national retrofits, you’ll be able to see the difference in the fluid communication and reduced surprises on projects involving Parker.

Brand consistency and design intent
Matching the overall design intent is another way to measure the ROI of using a lighting designer. This is another benefit that’s difficult to measure in financial impact, but a consistent brand presented to your customer or tenants makes your business more trustworthy and attractive. That’s an important win.

Increased sales from good lighting
Though study after study shows that quality lighting makes a difference to shoppers, lighting remains one of those things that is often taken for granted. It’s sort of like cell phone service or drinking water.

It’s not something most people pay attention to unless it’s off.
Just like cellular networks and purified drinking water, details matter in lighting. Ensuring a cell signal isn’t spotty or that the total dissolved soluble content of water is palatable is a science. And it’s pretty easy to mess up.

With lighting, mistakes rarely go unnoticed. And even the less-noticed ones can have a trickle-down effect on sales. The job of the lighting designer is to help you avoid such oversights, ensuring your lighting is sharp, consistent, and right for your brand – putting your product in the best possible light, rather than merely illuminating the space around it.

What’s an LED lighting retrofit?

LEDs use a fraction of the power that incandescent or fluorescent lighting consumes and last
many times longer than those types of bulbs, all while delivering the brightness, warmth and
color to fit your specific lighting needs. So now that you’re aware of how LEDs can save money,
improve lighting quality and reduce your carbon footprint, it’s time to put that green energy
solution to work for you.

You’ll often hear the word “retrofit” used to describe the replacement of your existing lighting
system with LEDs. It’s kind of odd that the word begins with “retro”, since that prefix usually
raises images of the past (think mullets and leisure suits) instead of the forward-thinking
technology that LEDs offer. Be that as it may, retrofit has become the accepted term for
upgrading your older lighting to newer, more energy efficient LED equipment.

Lighting accounts for about 15 to 20% of a typical commercial building’s energy use, so if you
haven’t already done an LED retrofit, every day you wait is costing you money. But if it’s any
consolation, you’re not alone. The U.S. Energy Information Administration says that as recently
as 2012, more than three-quarters of all the floor space in the nation’s commercial buildings was
lit by standard fluorescent lights, with another 6% of floor space still lit by incandescents.
Although LEDs have greatly increased their market share since that last government survey,
there is still a lot of old lighting out there that should be replaced.

It’s always best to take a whole-building approach to energy efficiency instead of treating each
separate measure – such as an LED retrofit – as a “one-off”. There are several reasons for this,
including the coordination among your building’s energy systems (i.e., installing low-heat LEDs
may impact your air conditioning needs) and more attractive rebates offered by utilities or
government entities for bundling energy efficiency measures to maximize energy savings.

Ideally, then, an LED retrofit is one part of an overall green energy solution for your business.
However, not every business owner may be in a financial position right now to undertake a
complete energy makeover. In that case, doing an LED retrofit as a stand-alone energy saving
measure immediately is better than waiting until a full upgrade can be made.

The first thing you should do before starting an LED retrofit is to decide why you want to do it. Is
it simply to reduce your energy costs (nothing wrong with that being the only reason!) or are you
also interested in adjusting the brightness or color quality of your lighting? What about using
lighting to improve the aesthetics of your space or the visual comfort of your employees or
customers? There are no right or wrong reasons for doing an LED retrofit, but knowing what
your goals are before you get started will help you install the lighting equipment you’ll need to
achieve them.

Once your goals are set, the next step is to have a lighting professional conduct a lighting audit.
An audit is the simplest and most effective way to evaluate your existing system and identify the
improvements needed to achieve your goals, ensuing that every area within your building has the
appropriate amount of light. The auditor’s recommendation will include the cost of each item and
an estimate of energy cost savings, so you can easily calculate how quickly your investment will
be repaid. If you have multiple locations that you’re looking to upgrade, it’s best to use the same
auditor for each site so you’ll have a consistent approach to the retrofits. An Ecology Action
energy efficiency advisor can assist you in choosing the lighting auditor who can best serve your
needs.

One of the advantages of LED lighting is that it can be used in existing fixtures, saving the cost of
installing new ones (as many businesses did years ago when they converted from incandescent
to fluorescent). In many cases, your existing fluorescent lighting fixtures can be retrofitted to LED
by simply removing the ballast and fluorescent lamp holders and replacing the fluorescent tubes
with LED tubes. There are also applications that offer a “plug and play” option, allowing you to
swap out your fluorescent tube with an LED without the need for removing the ballast and lamp
holders.

If you can’t use your existing fixtures for any reason, or if you’re altering your building’s lighting
plan by changing their location, you may need to install new LED fixtures. This is going to be a
more expensive option, but may result in greater long-term savings because fixtures specifically
designed for LEDs will operate more effectively than a retrofitted fluorescent fixture.

Incorporating lighting controls into your LED retrofit has the potential of increasing your energy
efficiency by providing the right amount of light when and where it’s needed. Lighting controls can
be as simple as a timer that turns lights on or off at pre-set times. They can also include more
advanced devices, like occupancy sensors that automatically turn on lights when motion is
detected in a space that isn’t continually in use (these have become popular in storage areas,
restrooms and conference rooms) or photocells that will adjust lighting levels depending on the
amount of available daylight.

In addition to meeting your building’s indoor lighting needs, the versatility of LEDs makes them
ideal for any of your outdoor lighting requirements. An LED’s performance is not affected by hot
or cold weather, which is why you see them now being used in safety-related outdoor
applications like traffic signals, streetlights and vehicle headlights. Commercial buildings often
have “wall pack lighting”, the fixtures mounted on the outside walls that provide both security for
the building and pathway lighting employees or customers. Wall pack lighting can also be used
for aesthetic purposes by illuminating the outside of your building. Lighting designers can take
advantage of the directional nature of LEDs and the variety of color temperatures available to
create dramatic effects while reducing your energy costs.

If your building has an outdoor parking lot or enclosed parking – like an adjacent deck or
underground parking – it’s important to include those areas in your LED retrofit. Parking areas
can be an ideal place to produce energy savings because they generally require large amounts
of lighting for safety and security. Parking lots have traditionally used high intensity discharge, or
HID, lighting like metal halide and high-pressure sodium lamps. While these kinds of lights
provide the brightness needed for parking areas, they use a lot of electricity. LEDs can deliver
the same level of brightness while using a fraction of the electricity, and can direct their light
precisely onto the areas that need to be lit instead of diffusing it in all directions. They’ll also last
three to four times longer than most HIDs. As with interior lighting, some LED lamps can be
retrofitted into existing fixtures in parking areas, saving the cost of installing new fixtures.

An LED retrofit is a key part of a green energy solution for any business. It’s easy to do and can
yield big savings. An Ecology Action energy efficiency expert can get you started in brightening up
your business – and your bottom line – with LEDs.

Smart Street Lighting as Fundamental Infrastructure for Future Smart City Applications

In its latest blog post, Osram addressed the significance of smart street lighting for future cities, noting that the digital transformation of city services is critical and will rely on connected city infrastructure.

The United Nations foresees that by 2050, 68% of the world population will live in urban areas. For enhanced safety, operational efficiency and sustainability, this growing and concentrated population need to be supported by integrated system and services. Smart street lighting thus serves as a primary smart city installation to simultaneously create the underline infrastructure for future applications.

Osram noted that smart street lighting is an ideal starting point for rolling out smart city applications because energy savings and operational efficiencies are significant and immediate. Smart street lighting offers up to 50% energy savings and 20% operational savings according to Itron, the US-based utility and energy managing expert.

Smart street lights nowadays not only illuminate roadways but also become strategic assets with integrated sensing technologies. Smart street lights can track the energy usage of each street light on the network and automate light levels based on activity in the area. It can also track environmental conditions such as CO2 levels, monitor traffic flow, identify collisions and other safety concerns.

As a result, smart street lighting can supports sustainability by saving power use. It also improves public safety with automated lighting adjustments that brighten or dim lights according to natural conditions or population in the area that improve visibility for pedestrians and cyclists and helps reduce accidents and crime. In addition, it gather data gathered on accidents to identify what intersections are the most dangerous and need redesign. Applications that monitor temperature, humidity and air quality can be integrated into the system as well. Gas leaks, earthquakes, gun shots, and other dangerous situations can be identified quickly to improve public safety response times.

Benefits of smart street lighting also include operational efficiency enhancement by automating management and delivering more precise outage information. Through the reducing the need for truck rolls and mobile crews, networked street lighting can increase operational savings.

Finally, since utility companies offer rebates for energy reduction but require data to validate energy savings, smart street light applications can provide the data needed for rebates and incentives from utility companies resulting in potential additional savings to taxpayers.

Properties of Light and How They’re Used in Architecture

If you’re a lighting manufacturer or supplier, you already know that light has a major effect on how a person experiences a space.

Did you know that architects and building engineers rely on these same principles and the science of lighting when designing a space? The main architectural principles of lighting can be broken down into three categories: light color, measuring light, and bouncing light.

Light Color

In architecture, the standard for white light is considered daylight at noon during the month of June. According to experts, Northern light is generally the most consistent and has more light at the blue end of the spectrum, while late afternoon light is more on the red end of the spectrum.

Measuring Light

Luminous Flux – This is the rate at which a light source emits light, measured in lumens.
Luminous Intensity – The measure of the light intensity that takes into account the amount of light and the amount of coverage. For example, a spot light and a flood light may emit the same high amount of lumens, but because the spot light is focused into a smaller cone, it has a much higher intensity. Intensity is measured in candelas or candlepower.
Illuminance – Illuminance is the amount of light that falls on a specific surface area. Measured in lux (metric) or foot candles (imperial – read more about foot candles here), a 1000 lumen spot light will illuminate a small area much more than a 1000 flood light because more lumens from a spot light are hitting the smaller surface.
Luminance – Luminance is the measure of an object’s brightness or the amount of light coming off an illuminated surface. This measurement is called a foot-lambert.

Don’t Forget to Consider Bouncing Light

When choosing fixtures and designing the space for optimal light, consider the reflections that will occur in the room depending on windows, furniture, and accessories (especially mirrors and other reflective surfaces).

Remember, besides the principles of lighting, choosing the right lighting for a residential or commercial space come down to how the space should physically feel (for example, the right lighting can make a room feel larger), and more lighting isn’t always better! Choosing the right lighting is the most important thing.

Trust Parker Lighting as Your Preferred Lighting Supplier

We have knowledgeable associates who can assist you in choosing the appropriate products for your specific application.

 

2021 Global LED Plant Lighting Market Will Exceed 2 Billion US Dollars

With the impact of global climate change and urbanization on traditional agriculture, the demand for plant lighting and energy consumption continues to expand. At the same time, with the maturity and popularity of LED lighting technology, LED lighting has also begun to integrate with agricultural applications. LED plant lighting has become the LED industry. A niche market. China’s LED plant industry has formed an industrial cluster, LED plant lighting has obvious advantages, will accelerate its market penetration, while the development of plant factories and the legalization of cannabis cultivation in the United States will further stimulate market demand.

The LED plant lighting industry cluster is distributed, and the Pearl River Delta is the largest industrial cluster area. At present, there are more than 150 enterprises involved in LED plant lighting in China, mainly distributed in the Pearl River Delta region, accounting for 60%, followed by the Yangtze River Delta region, accounting for 21%, and other regions accounting for 7%. Competition among local enterprises is not fierce, and they are still in the stage of R&D cooperation or demonstration and promotion. Any company in the future may stand out.

Lighting For Bonsai Trees

LED plant lights have obvious advantages and accelerate the occupation of the plant lighting market. At present, there are four major types of plant illumination sources on the market: LED lamps, fluorescent lamps, high-pressure sodium lamps, incandescent lamps, and halogen lamps. Traditional plant lamps are low in cost and therefore still used in plant lighting; LED lamps are emerging as plant lighting lamps. It is more energy-saving and environmentally friendly and has many advantages such as high luminous efficiency, low heat generation, small volume, long life, light quantity, and adjustable light quality. It has obvious advantages in the field of plant lighting. In terms of plant growth lamps, the market share of traditional types of plant lighting fixtures will gradually shrink in the next few years. It is expected that by 2021, the global LED plant growth lamp market will account for 60%.

The development of plant factories and the legalization of cannabis cultivation in the United States have injected more power into the development of LED plant lighting. Plant factories are the future trend and have received strong support from the agricultural departments of various countries. Zhongke Sanan, Mitsubishi Chemical, BOE, Panasonic and other domestic and foreign giants have invested heavily in plant factories. After the legalization of cannabis cultivation in the United States, the demand for small plant lighting systems will grow rapidly, both of which will drive the growth of LED plant lighting. It is estimated that by 2021, the global LED plant lighting system market will exceed 2 billion US dollars, including 490 million LED lamps.

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